Facebook to ban “bad” businesses

Facebook introduces policy to ban unreliable sellers

Facebook has introduced a new policy that bans bad quality businesses from advertising on their platform. The new policy gives users the opportunity to file a complaint about a business, causing a company with a significant number of complaints to face a ban.

The new policy has been implemented to help Facebook tackle advertising abuse on its website, and to prevent their platform being used as an accomplice to fraudulent activity. The change is a huge step for Facebook’s brand identity, which could see a major improvement as a result of showcasing reliable content.

Users will begin to see an improvement in the quality of Facebook ads, and the number of flawed business ads should decrease. This should improve a user’s shopping experience and create a sense of security from using a more trustworthy platform.

Rest assured, if a business is providing a reliable product or service, then the policy will not affect a user’s results. In fact, an authentic business may actually benefit from the new scheme by reducing the pool of competitors.

Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg is targeting e-commerce businesses that do not live up to user expectations. The social media giant constantly strives to improve its ethics and it was recently revealed that Facebook pays employees a higher than average salary when compared with other major tech companies.

Facebook researched customer experience and said in a blog post: “We spoke with people who have purchased things from Facebook advertisers, and the two biggest frustrations we heard were that people don’t like ads that quote inaccurate shipping times or that misrepresent products.”

The social media platform will give businesses at risk of facing the ban a final chance to address the grievances. Sarah Epps, a product marketing director at Facebook, told The Wall Street Journal that “for companies that do want to improve, we want to give them that opportunity.”

The new zero tolerance to scammers policy looks like a win for Facebook and reliable businesses.